Are You Ready for Zero Day Software Deployment?

1 month 2 weeks ago

Editorial Note: I originally wrote this post for the SubMain blog.  You can check out the original here, at their site.  While you’re there, take a look at CodeIt.Right and its automated code review capabilities. As a teenager, I remember having a passing interest in hacking.  Perhaps this came from watching the movie Sneakers.  Whatever […]

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Erik Dietrich

Freelance Software Development: Speaking to Your Buyers

1 month 2 weeks ago

I believe that at two, you have to call it a streak.  And so I’d like to celebrate my illustrious streak of reader question Fridays successfully delivered.  Today’s topic?  Freelance software development. This actually follows pretty naturally from last Friday’s post.  Toward the end of that post, I pleaded with software developers to stop worrying about […]

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Erik Dietrich

Adding Static Analysis to Your Team’s DNA

1 month 2 weeks ago

Editorial note: I originally wrote this post for the NDepend blog.  You can check out the original here, at their site.  While you’re there, download NDepend and play with adding it to your team’s build. Stop me if this sounds familiar.  (Well, not literally.  I realize that asynchronous publication makes it hard for you to […]

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Erik Dietrich

Characteristics of Good APIs

1 month 2 weeks ago

Editorial note: I originally wrote this post for the Monitis blog.  You can check out the original here, at their site.  While you’re there, take a look at their monitoring solutions. The term “API” seems to present something of a Rorschach Test for software developers.  Web developers think of APIs as REST endpoints and WSDLs.   In […]

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Erik Dietrich

What will the markets do if Labour wins?

1 month 2 weeks ago
WHEN the British election started, a victory for Theresa May looked a nailed-on certainty. The Conservative lead was as high as 20 percentage points and the party was 1/20 on to claim the most seats. But a poorly run campaign means that the gap has narrowed; the latest from Survation had the Conservatives with just a one-point lead.

Recovering from a Mission Critical Whiff

1 month 2 weeks ago

Editorial note: I originally wrote this post for the NDepend blog.  You can check out the original here, at their site.  While you’re there, download NDepend and give it a try. A career in software produces a handful of truly iconic moments.  First, you beam with pride the first time something you wrote works in […]

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Erik Dietrich

Ghost Doc Says the Damndest Things

1 month 3 weeks ago

Editorial Note: I originally wrote this post for the SubMain blog.  You can check out the original here, at their site.  While you’re there, have a look at GhostDoc, which can help both with code comment maintenance and the generation of help documentation. Some years ago, I was doing work for some client or another. […]

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Erik Dietrich

How to Freelance: The Low-Risk Path from Software Developer

1 month 3 weeks ago

Ah, the eternal opportunistic question: how to freelance?  You work as a software developer, making $100K per year or something.  This is a great wage, and so you have a great life, sitting pretty high up atop Maslow’s famed hierarchy.  But then you figure out that Steve in your group is actually a contractor, and a […]

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Erik Dietrich

The Most Commonly Reinvented Wheels in Software

1 month 3 weeks ago

Editorial note: I originally wrote this post for the Telerik blog.  You can check out the original here, at their site.  While you’re there, take a look at their developer tools and controls offerings — they’re quite extensive. If you ever want to set off a heated argument among software developers, you could do worse […]

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Erik Dietrich

Searching for art just got better. Where will you start?

1 month 3 weeks ago

While some are drawn to the strong brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s The Starry Night, others prefer gazing at the gilded glory of Klimt’s The Kiss, but one thing is certain: people love art. In fact, each month, there are more than 500 million art-related searches on Google. Now whether you’re a casual fan or a true culture vulture, Google can help you become an art expert. Starting today, when you search for art-related things, you’ll have access to more relevant results and the ability to dive deeper into topics of interest. We’ve also added a new feature in Street View (think digital museum guide!) that gives you key insights about the artworks on your virtual museum visits.

Explore more art right from Google Search

To help make your search for art a masterpiece, the Google Arts & Culture team joined forces with Google Search engineers to improve how our systems understand and recognize artworks, the places you can see them in person, the artists who made them, the materials they used, the art period they belong to and the connections among all these.

Now when you search an artist like Gustav Klimt, you’ll see an interactive Knowledge Panel that will highlight ways you can explore on a deeper level, like seeing a collection of the artist’s works or even scrolling through the museums where you can view the paintings on the wall. And for some pieces, you can click through to see picture-perfect high-resolution imagery right from Google Arts & Culture.

Google Arts & Culture, your virtual museum guide

You can visit hundreds of museums around the world right from your laptop with Google Maps and Google Arts & Culture. And starting today your virtual Street View tour is more informative on desktop and in the Chrome browser on mobile. Now as you walk through the rooms of the museums on Google Maps you’ll see clear and useful annotations on the wall next to each piece. Clicking on these annotations will bring you to a new page with more information provided by hundreds of the world’s renowned museums. You’ll also be able to zoom into high-resolution imagery—getting you closer to these iconic works than you ever thought possible.

To create this feature, we put our visual recognition software to work. Similar to how machine learning technology in Google Photos allows you to search for things in your gallery, this software scanned the walls of participating museums all over the world, identifying and categorizing more than 15,000 works.

Discovering the art world has never been easier on Google, and we hope this inspires you to brush up on your art knowledge. So take a moment. Dive in. Who knows—with a stroke of luck, you may find yourself drawn...to art!

Searching for art just got better. Where will you start?

1 month 3 weeks ago

While some are drawn to the strong brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s The Starry Night, others prefer gazing at the gilded glory of Klimt’s The Kiss, but one thing is certain: people love art. In fact, each month, there are more than 500 million art-related searches on Google. Now whether you’re a casual fan or a true culture vulture, Google can help you become an art expert. Starting today, when you search for art-related things, you’ll have access to more relevant results and the ability to dive deeper into topics of interest. We’ve also added a new feature in Street View (think digital museum guide!) that gives you key insights about the artworks on your virtual museum visits.

Explore more art right from Google Search

To help make your search for art a masterpiece, the Google Arts & Culture team joined forces with Google Search engineers to improve how our systems understand and recognize artworks, the places you can see them in person, the artists who made them, the materials they used, the art period they belong to and the connections among all these.

Now when you search an artist like Gustav Klimt, you’ll see an interactive Knowledge Panel that will highlight ways you can explore on a deeper level, like seeing a collection of the artist’s works or even scrolling through the museums where you can view the paintings on the wall. And for some pieces, you can click through to see picture-perfect high-resolution imagery right from Google Arts & Culture.

Google Arts & Culture, your virtual museum guide

You can visit hundreds of museums around the world right from your laptop with Google Maps and Google Arts & Culture. And starting today your virtual Street View tour is more informative on desktop and in the Chrome browser on mobile. Now as you walk through the rooms of the museums on Google Maps you’ll see clear and useful annotations on the wall next to each piece. Clicking on these annotations will bring you to a new page with more information provided by hundreds of the world’s renowned museums. You’ll also be able to zoom into high-resolution imagery—getting you closer to these iconic works than you ever thought possible.

To create this feature, we put our visual recognition software to work. Similar to how machine learning technology in Google Photos allows you to search for things in your gallery, this software scanned the walls of participating museums all over the world, identifying and categorizing more than 15,000 works.

Discovering the art world has never been easier on Google, and we hope this inspires you to brush up on your art knowledge. So take a moment. Dive in. Who knows—with a stroke of luck, you may find yourself drawn...to art!