U.S. Future Inflation Gauge Near 8 3/4 year high

3 weeks 2 days ago
U.S. inflationary pressures were down in March, as the U.S. future inflation gauge decreased to 113.2 from a 113.5 reading in February, according to data released Friday morning by the Economic Cycle Research Institute."While the USFIG dipped in March, it remains in a cyclical upswing," ECRI Chief Operations Officer Lakshman Achuthan said in a release. "In essence, underlying inflation pressure...
ECRI

Fact Check now available in Google Search and News around the world

3 weeks 2 days ago

Google was built to help people find useful information by surfacing the great content that publishers and sites create. This access to high quality information is what drives people to use the web and for contributors to continue to engage and invest in it.

However, with thousands of new articles published online every minute of every day, the amount of content confronting people online can be overwhelming.  And unfortunately, not all of it is factual or true, making it hard for people to distinguish fact from fiction. That’s why last October, along with our partners at Jigsaw, we announced that in a few countries we would start enabling publishers to show a “Fact Check” tag in Google News for news stories. This label identifies articles that include information fact checked by news publishers and fact-checking organizations.

After assessing feedback from both users and publishers, we’re making the Fact Check label in Google News available everywhere, and expanding it into Search globally in all languages. For the first time, when you conduct a search on Google that returns an authoritative result containing fact checks for one or more public claims, you will see that information clearly on the search results page. The snippet will display information on the claim, who made the claim, and the fact check of that particular claim.

This information won’t be available for every search result, and there may be search result pages where different publishers checked the same claim and reached different conclusions. These fact checks are not Google’s and are presented so people can make more informed judgements. Even though differing conclusions may be presented, we think it’s still helpful for people to understand the degree of consensus around a particular claim and have clear information on which sources agree. As we make fact checks more visible in Search results, we believe people will have an easier time reviewing and assessing these fact checks, and making their own informed opinions.

For publishers to be included in this feature, they must be using the Schema.org ClaimReview markup on the specific pages where they fact check public statements (documentation here), or they can use the Share the Facts widget developed by the Duke University Reporters Lab and Jigsaw. Only publishers that are algorithmically determined to be an authoritative source of information will qualify for inclusion. Finally, the content must adhere to the general policies that apply to all structured data markup, the Google News Publisher criteria for fact checks, and the standards for accountability and transparency, readability or proper site representation as articulated in our Google News General Guidelines. If a publisher or fact check claim does not meet these standards or honor these policies, we may, at our discretion, ignore that site's markup.

This effort wouldn’t be possible without the help of other organizations and the fact check community, which has grown to 115 organizations. To find out more about this new feature, visit the Help Center.

Fact Check now available in Google Search and News around the world

3 weeks 2 days ago

Google was built to help people find useful information by surfacing the great content that publishers and sites create. This access to high quality information is what drives people to use the web and for contributors to continue to engage and invest in it.

However, with thousands of new articles published online every minute of every day, the amount of content confronting people online can be overwhelming.  And unfortunately, not all of it is factual or true, making it hard for people to distinguish fact from fiction. That’s why last October, along with our partners at Jigsaw, we announced that in a few countries we would start enabling publishers to show a “Fact Check” tag in Google News for news stories. This label identifies articles that include information fact checked by news publishers and fact-checking organizations.

After assessing feedback from both users and publishers, we’re making the Fact Check label in Google News available everywhere, and expanding it into Search globally in all languages. For the first time, when you conduct a search on Google that returns an authoritative result containing fact checks for one or more public claims, you will see that information clearly on the search results page. The snippet will display information on the claim, who made the claim, and the fact check of that particular claim.

This information won’t be available for every search result, and there may be search result pages where different publishers checked the same claim and reached different conclusions. These fact checks are not Google’s and are presented so people can make more informed judgements. Even though differing conclusions may be presented, we think it’s still helpful for people to understand the degree of consensus around a particular claim and have clear information on which sources agree. As we make fact checks more visible in Search results, we believe people will have an easier time reviewing and assessing these fact checks, and making their own informed opinions.

For publishers to be included in this feature, they must be using the Schema.org ClaimReview markup on the specific pages where they fact check public statements (documentation here), or they can use the Share the Facts widget developed by the Duke University Reporters Lab and Jigsaw. Only publishers that are algorithmically determined to be an authoritative source of information will qualify for inclusion. Finally, the content must adhere to the general policies that apply to all structured data markup, the Google News Publisher criteria for fact checks, and the standards for accountability and transparency, readability or proper site representation as articulated in our Google News General Guidelines. If a publisher or fact check claim does not meet these standards or honor these policies, we may, at our discretion, ignore that site's markup.

This effort wouldn’t be possible without the help of other organizations and the fact check community, which has grown to 115 organizations. To find out more about this new feature, visit the Help Center.

Fact Check now available in Google Search and News around the world

3 weeks 2 days ago

Google was built to help people find useful information by surfacing the great content that publishers and sites create. This access to high quality information is what drives people to use the web and for contributors to continue to engage and invest in it.

However, with thousands of new articles published online every minute of every day, the amount of content confronting people online can be overwhelming.  And unfortunately, not all of it is factual or true, making it hard for people to distinguish fact from fiction. That’s why last October, along with our partners at Jigsaw, we announced that in a few countries we would start enabling publishers to show a “Fact Check” tag in Google News for news stories. This label identifies articles that include information fact checked by news publishers and fact-checking organizations.

After assessing feedback from both users and publishers, we’re making the Fact Check label in Google News available everywhere, and expanding it into Search globally in all languages. For the first time, when you conduct a search on Google that returns an authoritative result containing fact checks for one or more public claims, you will see that information clearly on the search results page. The snippet will display information on the claim, who made the claim, and the fact check of that particular claim.

This information won’t be available for every search result, and there may be search result pages where different publishers checked the same claim and reached different conclusions. These fact checks are not Google’s and are presented so people can make more informed judgements. Even though differing conclusions may be presented, we think it’s still helpful for people to understand the degree of consensus around a particular claim and have clear information on which sources agree. As we make fact checks more visible in Search results, we believe people will have an easier time reviewing and assessing these fact checks, and making their own informed opinions.

For publishers to be included in this feature, they must be using the Schema.org ClaimReview markup on the specific pages where they fact check public statements (documentation here), or they can use the Share the Facts widget developed by the Duke University Reporters Lab and Jigsaw. Only publishers that are algorithmically determined to be an authoritative source of information will qualify for inclusion. Finally, the content must adhere to the general policies that apply to all structured data markup, the Google News Publisher criteria for fact checks, and the standards for accountability and transparency, readability or proper site representation as articulated in our Google News General Guidelines. If a publisher or fact check claim does not meet these standards or honor these policies, we may, at our discretion, ignore that site's markup.

This effort wouldn’t be possible without the help of other organizations and the fact check community, which has grown to 115 organizations. To find out more about this new feature, visit the Help Center.

The Polyglot’s Dilemma

3 weeks 2 days ago

Few things seem as institutional to the programming world as what I call the experience tuple.  A company needs to hire someone to automate something, so, naturally, it asks the software development group to make alphabet soup for dice.com.  “We need someone with (C#, XML, HTML, JS, ASP, MVC, REST, Angular, AJAX) with (React, MSTest, […]

The post The Polyglot’s Dilemma appeared first on DaedTech.

  
Erik Dietrich

Weekly roundup: Tips for writing a better to-do list

3 weeks 2 days ago
The to-do list is one of the most classic productivity tools we have. And a lot of us rely on one. But that doesn’t mean we know how to use them well. If you tend to lose your to-do list, avoid it when it becomes overwhelmingly long, or you simply forget to use one, these […]
Belle B. Cooper

'Ancient History' Cannot Deny Cycle Upturn

3 weeks 4 days ago
To begin with, what Dimon’s talking about is not just old news, it’s practically ancient, and we’ve known and written about it for many years.  More importantly, it conflates long-term structural problems with the nearer-term cyclical outlook, which remains the best it’s been in years. U.S. economic growth has been in a cyclical upturn since mid-2016: GDP growth is at one-year highIP growth is ...
ECRI

The Relationship between Static Analysis and Continuous Testing

3 weeks 4 days ago

Editorial Note: I originally wrote this post for the NDepend blog.  You can check out the original here, at their site.  While you’re there, download NDepend and give it a try. As an adult, I have learned that I have an introvert type personality.  I do alright socially, don’t mind public speaking, and do not […]

The post The Relationship between Static Analysis and Continuous Testing appeared first on DaedTech.

  
Erik Dietrich

How to do your best work (and figure out what that is)

3 weeks 4 days ago
Not all work is meaningful. Not all work is even useful. We’ve all felt the frustration of getting caught up doing busywork that seems necessary but takes our time and attention away from more important activities. At RescueTime, we’re working to ensure more meaningful work happens in the world. As part of that mission, we’re […]
Belle B. Cooper

Inflation Volatility Hurting Italian Consumers

3 weeks 5 days ago
While the European Central Bank decided to keep interest rates unchanged earlier this month, ECRI had pointed out that “widespread inflation cycle upswings across the advanced economies are now in evidence,” consistent with our global reflation call from last summer. In fact, following the earlier upturn in ECRI’s Italian Future Inflation Gauge , Italian CPI growth has been increasing since las...
ECRI

Interview: NAFTA & Jobs

3 weeks 6 days ago
It’s important to understand the lay of the land. In the second half of 2016 Mexican exports growth rebounded to a one-year high, and paradoxically, the plunge in the peso trigged by Trump’s election actually made Mexican exports even more price competitive. Furthermore, ECRI’s Mexican Leading Exports Index, which anticipated that bounce in Mexican exports, is still pretty optimistic.The Trump ...
ECRI

Reader Question Round-Up

3 weeks 6 days ago

I’ve just returned from a vacation.  So, after a week of R&R, I’m going to write a post instead of cross posting one.  And I thought that getting back to reader questions after a hiatus might make for a good “welcome back” post. I mercifully do not struggle with writer’s block.  As someone who gets […]

The post Reader Question Round-Up appeared first on DaedTech.

  
Erik Dietrich

Is inequality here to stay?

4 weeks 1 day ago
IN HIS bleak economic history “The Great Leveler” (reviewed here), Walter Scheidel suggests says that inequality has been around ever since humans began farming and that only the “four horsemen”—mass warfare, genuine revolution, state collapse and pandemics—have managed to bring it down since.

Throwing your dog a bone: Google now works purr-fectly for your furry friends

4 weeks 1 day ago

At Google, we aim to make our products available for everyone, everywhere. Today, we’re extending that goal to our finest, most faithful (and four-legged) friends. On the Google app for iOS, you can now use 3D Touch on the app icon or head to settings and select I’m Feeling Woof or I’m Feeling Meow to let your dogs and cats get info on topics they care about—whether that means squeaky toys or a bowl of milk! With I’m Feeling Woof and I’m Feeling Meow on the Google app, canines and felines alike can surf pet-friendly info with just a press of their paw.

Now when pups tap on I’m Feeling Woof, no search query is too far-fetched. Man’s best friend can peruse squirrels, rawhide bones and frisbees to their hearts’ content. Let the tail-wagging commence.

On the other paw, kitties are able to search the Google app with I’m Feeling Meow—or should we say wow?! Suddenly a world of fishbowls, birds and scratching posts are just a whisker away. Fur real.

Now that the Google app for iOS is raining cats and dogs, we can turn our attention to the rest of the animal kingdom (and those who use Android)! Introducing “Google Play for Pets,” a new category of Android apps and games to keep your pet stimulated. See how Google Play for Pets benefits all types of creatures in our announcement video below. After all, who wouldn’t want apps, games, and training tools designed specially for your dog, cat or... turtle?

Introducing Google Play for Pets

We hope today’s announcements will help unlock the Internet for your favorite four-legged creatures. Now the best of Google is available for all, no matter your location—or in this case—species.

Throwing your dog a bone: Google now works purr-fectly for your furry friends

4 weeks 1 day ago

At Google, we aim to make our products available for everyone, everywhere. Today, we’re extending that goal to our finest, most faithful (and four-legged) friends. On the Google app for iOS, you can now use 3D Touch on the app icon or head to settings and select I’m Feeling Woof or I’m Feeling Meow to let your dogs and cats get info on topics they care about—whether that means squeaky toys or a bowl of milk! With I’m Feeling Woof and I’m Feeling Meow on the Google app, canines and felines alike can surf pet-friendly info with just a press of their paw.

Now when pups tap on I’m Feeling Woof, no search query is too far-fetched. Man’s best friend can peruse squirrels, rawhide bones and frisbees to their hearts’ content. Let the tail-wagging commence.

On the other paw, kitties are able to search the Google app with I’m Feeling Meow—or should we say wow?! Suddenly a world of fishbowls, birds and scratching posts are just a whisker away. Fur real.

Now that the Google app for iOS is raining cats and dogs, we can turn our attention to the rest of the animal kingdom (and those who use Android)! Introducing “Google Play for Pets,” a new category of Android apps and games to keep your pet stimulated. See how Google Play for Pets benefits all types of creatures in our announcement video below. After all, who wouldn’t want apps, games, and training tools designed specially for your dog, cat or... turtle?

Introducing Google Play for Pets

We hope today’s announcements will help unlock the Internet for your favorite four-legged creatures. Now the best of Google is available for all, no matter your location—or in this case—species.

Throwing your dog a bone: Google now works purr-fectly for your furry friends

4 weeks 1 day ago

At Google, we aim to make our products available for everyone, everywhere. Today, we’re extending that goal to our finest, most faithful (and four-legged) friends. On the Google app for iOS, you can now use 3D Touch on the app icon or head to settings and select I’m Feeling Woof or I’m Feeling Meow to let your dogs and cats get info on topics they care about—whether that means squeaky toys or a bowl of milk! With I’m Feeling Woof and I’m Feeling Meow on the Google app, canines and felines alike can surf pet-friendly info with just a press of their paw.

Now when pups tap on I’m Feeling Woof, no search query is too far-fetched. Man’s best friend can peruse squirrels, rawhide bones and frisbees to their hearts’ content. Let the tail-wagging commence.

On the other paw, kitties are able to search the Google app with I’m Feeling Meow—or should we say wow?! Suddenly a world of fishbowls, birds and scratching posts are just a whisker away. Fur real.

Now that the Google app for iOS is raining cats and dogs, we can turn our attention to the rest of the animal kingdom (and those who use Android)! Introducing “Google Play for Pets,” a new category of Android apps and games to keep your pet stimulated. See how Google Play for Pets benefits all types of creatures in our announcement video below. After all, who wouldn’t want apps, games, and training tools designed specially for your dog, cat or... turtle?

Introducing Google Play for Pets

We hope today’s announcements will help unlock the Internet for your favorite four-legged creatures. Now the best of Google is available for all, no matter your location—or in this case—species.

The High Five: all eyes on April

4 weeks 2 days ago

When your week feels like it will never end, just imagine how it feels to be a pregnant giraffe. Here’s a look at five of the top trending Google searches from the week of March 27.

The Raiders’ big bet

It’s official—the Raiders are moving to Las Vegas. This week, the Oakland franchise announced that they’ll be taking their talents to Sin City. Though the move won’t take place until 2020, people are already searching for season tickets. Still, questions remain—like what are the odds the team will get to keep their name?

We hardly knew EU

Raider fans aren’t the only nation facing change. British Prime Minister Theresa May triggered Article 50 this week, officially kicking off the process for the U.K. to exit the European Union in 2019. People turned to search to ask “What does Brexit mean for Britain?” and “How does Brexit affect the EU?” They’re also curious about how it will affect financial markets: “Brexit stocks” is the top trending related search to “stocks” worldwide in the past week.

A twist ending?

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences confirmed that accounting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers will continue to work for the Oscars next year, putting an end to queries like "Did the Oscars fire Pwc?" and "Will the Oscars retain PwC?" But after this year’s Best Picture envelope mix-up, which was blamed on a employee distracted by his phone, PwC's accountants will have to stash their devices next time. Apparently when it comes to the movies, simply silencing your cell phones is no longer sufficient.

April the Giraffe

People across the internet are craning their necks to find out more about April the Giraffe, who’s awaiting the birth of her new baby calf at the Animal Adventure Park in upstate New York. The zoo launched a live stream for people to tune in to the birth way back in February. But yesterday, they announced that the “calf countdown” had begun. The timing—and the mama-to-be’s name—has some people skeptical: Top queries include “Is April the Giraffe an April Fool’s joke?” and “Is April the Giraffe a hoax?”

But seriously...Only time will tell if April the Giraffe is having the longest labor in documented giraffe history or pulling your leg. But if the spike in searches are any indication, you should prepare to be pranked by someone out there this April Fools’ Day. Not by us, though. We’d never do that.