The euro’s obituaries were premature

16 hours 28 minutes ago
FIVE years ago, Mario Draghi, head of the European Central Bank, pledged to do “whatever it takes” to save the euro. At the time, many people were predicting that the euro zone would break up. But Mr Draghi pulled off the trick; no countries have left the single currency.

Britain: back to being the sick man of Europe?

1 week ago
IN THE 1970s, Britain was dubbed “the sick man of Europe”, a role previously played by the Ottoman empire in the late 19th century. A poor growth record since the second world war combined with terrible industrial relations (29m days lost to strikes in 1979) to make many ask the question “Is Britain governable?”.

The psychic Brexit ballot paper

2 weeks 2 days ago
DR WHO, the long-running British science-fiction hero, has a long-standing device to get him out of tricky situations; a piece of "psychic paper" that lulls the viewer into accepting the doctor's credentials. Apparently blank, the paper says whatever the Doctor wants it to say.

The psychic Brexit ballot paper

2 weeks 2 days ago
DR WHO, the long-running British science-fiction hero, has a long-standing device to get him out of tricky situations; a piece of "psychic paper" that lulls the viewer into accepting the doctor's credentials. Apparently blank, the paper says whatever the Doctor wants it to say.

Why the falling oil price isn’t hurting markets

1 month ago
INVESTORS could easily get confused about the impact of oil-price rises on the economy and markets. The story seemed to be clear: high prices bad, low prices good. The two great oil shocks in the 1970s were unambiguously bad for Western economies—ushering in stagflation and transferring spending power to the oil-producing countries.

Why the falling oil price isn’t hurting markets

1 month ago
INVESTORS could easily get confused about the impact of oil-price rises on the economy and markets. The story seemed to be clear: high prices bad, low prices good. The two great oil shocks in the 1970s were unambiguously bad for Western economies—ushering in stagflation and transferring spending power to the oil-producing countries.

The globalisation counter-reaction

1 month 1 week ago
WHEN the Archduke Franz Ferdinand (pictured right) was assassinated in 1914, there were few initial indications that world war would follow. In retrospect, many people have argued that the killing was a freak event that should not have resulted in the folly of war. But was the subsequent war really an exogenous event?

The globalisation counter-reaction

1 month 1 week ago
WHEN the Archduke Franz Ferdinand (pictured right) was assassinated in 1914, there were few initial indications that world war would follow. In retrospect, many people have argued that the killing was a freak event that should not have resulted in the folly of war. But was the subsequent war really an exogenous event?

What will the markets do if Labour wins?

1 month 2 weeks ago
WHEN the British election started, a victory for Theresa May looked a nailed-on certainty. The Conservative lead was as high as 20 percentage points and the party was 1/20 on to claim the most seats. But a poorly run campaign means that the gap has narrowed; the latest from Survation had the Conservatives with just a one-point lead.
Checked
1 hour 29 minutes ago
Analysis of the ever-changing financial markets (Wall Street trades used to take place under a Buttonwood tree)
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